May/Jun
2017

Health, Wealth and Happiness: What is Happiness?

Print Email
Written by Emily Watkins

I vividly remember a moment, driving home from a date with my high school boyfriend, when I felt a physical wave of happiness sweep over me. That's an elusive feeling, one that is reserved for only the really special moments in life: walking down the aisle toward my love and holding my newborn sons, ranking the highest of those moments.

WHAT MAKES YOU HAPPY?

Things that make me happy: naps, reading good books, red wine, fluffy TV shows, watching my kids play sports, dates with my husband. But not many things bring that visceral feeling of happiness. 

Friends say happiness is family, children, God, being a source of healing for others, being a mom and wife, being part of a church community. Others say that keeping their minds and bodies engaged in meaningful pursuits and being able to control their own activities and change their minds are what make them happy. 

 

May/Jun
2017

Did You Say Something? Dementia or Hearing Loss

Print Email
Written by Dr. Amy Swain, Audiologist

Summertime brings family members together for reunions, weddings and graduation parties. During these events, we might notice our parents aging and sense some changes in their cognition or memory. You may begin to wonder if they have a memory issue. Researchers are now saying we should not assume it is a memory issue because it is possible they just didn’t hear the whole conversation.

LINK BETWEEN ALZHEIMER’S AND HEARING LOSS

Many studies show a link between Alzheimer’s disease and hearing loss. The reality is that hearing loss has a bigger impact on our health than we realize.

Frank Lin, otolaryngologist and epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, has completed multiple studies that reveal the link between cognitive decline and hearing loss. In his 2011 study, results showed that seniors with hearing loss were significantly more likely to develop dementia than their counterparts who had normal hearing. The reason for the link is unknown, but researchers have suggested that dementia and hearing loss might have a common underlying pathology. Dementia may be exacerbated for seniors with hearing loss because it takes more effort for that individual to hear and understand conversations, putting more stress on the brain.  

 

May/Jun
2017

Of Girls and Horses: Lettering in Equestrian

Print Email
Written by Holly Galbus

Equestrian is one of the newest lettering opportunities in sports for high school girls. The program, written and proposed to the Rochester Public School district by Susan Austin and Eliese Klennert, is now in its second year.

THE SPORT OF EQUESTRIAN

Eliese Klennert, owner of The Stables Equestrian Center, is a certified riding instructor and coach. She volunteers her time as advisor for the Rochester Public School District’s Equestrian Club. 

Klennert says equestrian is a physical and mental sport. “Coaches say 90 percent of riding is between your ears, meaning it’s mentally challenging. You might be dealing with a horse who is having a bad day. Also, your teammate (the horse) doesn’t speak your language. So, along with developing the physical skills needed in the sport, riders learn to communicate with the horse.” Klennert explains the sport is also physically demanding, as riders need to “own their own body” and be able to influence the horse, a 1,200-pound animal who isn’t always interested in following the rider’s signals.

 

Mar/Apr
2017

The Beauty of Giving and Receiving: Stylists Embrace the Gift of Life through Kidney Transplants

Print Email
Written by Trish Amundson Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

The month of March—National Kidney Month—calls attention to kidney disease, raising awareness about kidney health, prevention of kidney disease and lifesaving treatments. It’s the perfect time to learn more about the need for organ donors and transplant options. For local hair stylists and 15-year colleagues Katie Chapman and Sonja Kalis, it’s an opportunity to reflect on their experience of giving and receiving the gift of life.

PREPARING FOR THE WORST

Three years ago, Sonja was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and told she would need a kidney transplant. “I thought it would be many years down the road,” she recalls. “But 18 months later, they told me I had to have it sooner rather than later.” 

The seriousness of her medical situation became more real than ever before. Her name went on the transplant list, a long list of individuals waiting for a kidney from a deceased donor. Unfortunately, many patients with kidney failure end up on dialysis before they reach the top of the list—before a transplant is possible. 

 

Mar/Apr
2017

The Art of Coaching: Teaching Life Skills on the Ice

Print Email
Written by Holly Galbus

The puck dropped for the first time for Rochester varsity girls hockey on November 14, 1995 at Graham Arena. There were two teams in that inaugural season, and the first games played were John Marshall versus Owatonna and Mayo versus Minnetonka.

Twenty-two years later, the game of hockey has become the sport of choice for many young women in our area.  The lessons learned extend beyond stickhandling, skating and passing the puck.  Gains in confidence, leadership and teamwork contribute to success on and off the ice.

COACHING PHILOSOPHIES

Bob Montrose, retired John Marshall Rockets girls hockey coach, says that in coaching, “It’s about surrounding players with a culture of really trying hard.” He says success on the ice is determined by essentially two things: keeping the energy level of the players up and having a skilled goalie. Keeping the energy level of the players up is about cultivating excitement for the game. This begins at the start of every practice, he says, with a fun, competitive game.  Mike McCormack has 31 years coaching experience and is in his third season as head coach of the Mayo Spartans girls hockey team.  Earlier this winter, the Spartans celebrated a win in overtime over crosstown rival the John Marshall Rockets, something that hasn’t been done in five years. “I’ve never seen a happier group of kids in my life,” he says. “For many, it was the most important hockey game in their life.”

 

Mar/Apr
2017

Body Contouring: Weight Loss and Skin Removal

Print Email
Written by Brittney Marschall

After losing a significant amount of weight, extra skin can make it difficult to manage a healthy, active lifestyle or a more sleek and toned appearance. Body contouring can remove excess skin and fat tissue from one or more areas of the abdomen, hips, buttocks, thighs, chest, arms or breasts. 

BODY CONTOURING CHOICES

Body contouring involves many choices. One of the most important is choosing a surgeon you can trust. There are several options here
in Rochester.

Olmsted Medical Center (OMC) offers reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Dr. Srdan Babovic and the newest member of the OMC plastic surgery department, Dr. Ghassan Mehio, share a passion for helping people look their best. Dr. Babovic has been a practicing plastic surgeon since 2000 and is named one of America’s Top Plastic Surgeons according to Consumers’ Research Council of America (Reconstructive Surgery Liposuction Facts, Tummy Tuck). OMC cooperates with other doctors and specialists in many medical groups, including Mayo Clinic and private practitioners. 

 

Mar/Apr
2017

Only Half (13.1) Crazy: Journey of Four Non-Traditional Runners

Print Email
Written by Stephanie J. Sawyer

Brenda Shamblin, Mandy Wanzek, Kathy Johnson and I were all acquaintances, and we have become very close friends over the past four years. Our journey started in 2012 when we met at Moms on the Run, a running group for moms of varying fitness levels. The program’s support system of coach and team community has been life-changing for many moms who said, “I couldn’t run around the block,” and are now running half marathons. This was true for us, and our group catapulted us into a world where we didn’t think we belonged. 

MOTIVATION

Last year, we decided to set a lofty goal. We signed up for the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon in Las Vegas, Nevada. We followed the Hal Higdon training plan for half marathon training. We did short runs during the week and long runs on the weekend. Time constraints were definitely the biggest challenge for us. We are all working moms, and carving out the time for training was difficult. We ran three mornings a week at 5:30 a.m. It wasn’t easy, but I can speak for all of us when I say it was well worth it.

 

Today, 8 million women in the United States are living with heart disease, and 35 million are at risk. According to American Heart Association, heart diseases cause one in three deaths in women.* Heart disease affects more women than men and is the leading cause of death in the nation. Fortunately, heart disease can often be prevented by making healthy choices and managing health conditions. During February—American Heart Month—and throughout the year, activities raise awareness and inform about the threat of heart disease.

LOCAL SYMPOSIUM EDUCATES AND EMPOWERS WOMEN WITH HEART DISEASE

Fifteen years ago, the Women’s Heart Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester and WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease in Washington, D.C. developed an education and advocacy program for women living with heart disease. The WomenHeart Science and Leadership Symposium at Mayo Clinic is the only national volunteer training program that prepares women with heart disease to be community educators, advocates, spokespersons and support network coordinators. 

 

I am a busy working mom, and like everyone, I want and need to eat good food for health, energy and well-being. As a personal trainer and fitness instructor, I also want to set a good example for my members and clients. But I also really love to eat. I love to try new foods and share food with others, and it’s one of the ways I show my family that I love them.

Gone are the days of leisurely grocery shopping and sipping a glass of wine while chopping and sautéing. Now I work until 5:30 p.m. or later most nights, and then the kids have sports, which means we have a very small window in which to prepare and scarf down supper. 

Like most families, we are on a budget, which means that eating out every night just isn’t in the cards. So how can we feed our families healthy food with time and budget limitations?

 

As we head into National Children’s Dental Health Month in February, it comes time to set the record straight about dental health. Katie Post, DDS, of Northwest Dental Group says only 60 percent of the population goes to a dentist on a regular basis. With the remaining 40 percent uninformed, there are some dental health myths to correct.

Those teeth-whitening toothpastes? Not the answer, Post says. Duration of brushing your teeth, two times per day? Two minutes each session. Gatorade? Worse for your teeth than Mountain Dew. As for when kids should start brushing, Post says the earlier the better so children get accustomed to “you being in their mouth.” Once older, there’s no great time to introduce teeth brushing. “As soon as they can run from you, they will,” Post remarks.

HITTING THE STREETS (OR SCHOOLS)

Post promotes Children’s Dental Health Month by going to several elementary schools and daycares to talk to kids. She tells them how to properly brush their teeth, talks about the “mean” sugar bug that causes cavities, and allows kids to play with dental instruments and tools. She also discusses what path kids should follow if they’re interested in the dentistry field.

 

Page 1 of 7

Home | About Us | Advertise | Read | Connect | Subscribe | Submit | Contact Us

Rochester Women Magazine, Women Communications, L.L.C
PO Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903, 507-259-6362

Copyright 2016