Jan/Feb
2018

A Day in the Life of Dr. Carol Reid

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Written by Emily Watkins

Olmsted Medical Center’s new Otolaryngologist 

Otolaryngology is “the oldest medical specialty in the United States. Otolaryngologists are physicians trained to diagnose and manage diseases and disorders of the ears, nose, sinuses, larynx (voice box), mouth and throat, as well as structures of the neck and face. They are commonly referred to as ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) physicians,” according to American Academy of Otolaryngology website.

OTOLARYNGOLOGISTS AT OMC

With the addition of Carol M. Reid, M.D., Olmsted Medical Center’s ENT department doubled from one to two doctors in 2017. Reid and Christopher Dennis Frisch, M.D. treat adults and pediatric patients for both acute and chronic conditions. If necessary, OMC’s ENT department partners with their plastic surgery department when septorhinoplasty (nasal repair) is needed as part of treatment.

 

Jan/Feb
2018

Curling Sweeps the Globe

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Written by Holly Galbus

 

From the Gangneung Curling Centre in South Korea to the Rochester Recreation Center

There’s a growing interest in Rochester for the sport of curling, a game often referred to as “chess on ice.” The Curling Club of Rochester formed in August 2017 with a kickoff event attended by more than 100 people. 

 

Kelsey Schuder, board president of the club and curling instructor, says there is great interest in the sport of curling locally, but what is needed is a dedicated curling ice facility, a place where participants can play on ice prepared specifically for the game. 

CURLING FOR ALL AGES

Schuder says the reasons for the sport’s gaining popularity are numerous. “Literally anyone can curl,” she says, “even before the age of 6. And I know some 90-year-olds who play. Also participants do not need to be athletically inclined to play.” 

 

Nov/Dec
2017

STRIVE to Save Lives

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Written by By Trish Amundson

A mammogram is an important screening tool for breast cancer. Unfortunately for some women, some early cancers can be missed by current screening methods and are only detected once symptoms occur. The STRIVE Study is now underway at Mayo Clinic in an effort to change all that—and develop a new test to give cancer patients the timely diagnoses they need. 

Research for a Cure 

According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women in 2017, and about 40,610 women will die from it this year. The earlier breast cancer is found, the higher the chance of a cure. The blood test being evaluated in STRIVE, a study by the company GRAIL, uses high-intensity DNA sequencing to analyze blood samples for genetic material released by tumors—and find breast cancer early.  

 

Nov/Dec
2017

Health, Wealth & Happiness

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Written by By Emily Watkins

Personal Training for Sustainable Results

Are you overwhelmed by all the information that is out there about exercise and nutrition? What exactly does it mean to “exercise and eat right?” Hire a personal trainer to get a healthy living plan that is tailor-made for you.

FEEL BETTER

Men and women come in all shapes and sizes and are looking for a variety of results. In my initial consultation with clients, I spend a lot of time listening so that I get to know their personality. 

 

Nov/Dec
2017

Suffering in Silence

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Written by By Andrea Thomas

When to ask for help when struggling with depression.

For years I suffered in silence, a silence that almost killed me. I was exhausted by the daily grind of trying to hide the pain and suffering that was constantly stirring within me. Lying in bed, unable to shut off the faucet of negative thoughts and traumatic images, I made the choice to hop behind the wheel of my Chevy Beretta in an attempt to put the ultimate end to this battle. I was done fighting.                

NIGHTMARES AND FLASHBACKS

I was in my second year of undergraduate study and unaware I was living with severe depression and ongoing trauma symptoms which were interfering with my ability to function on a daily basis. I was very sick with an illness I knew nothing about. I felt alone and hopeless. I was determined to figure everything out on my own. In that moment driving down that dark highway, I did not want to die, I wanted my pain to end. My life had become a series of ongoing nightmares and daytime flashbacks from traumatic events. I couldn’t explain my pain; I viewed myself as a strong person and therefore, I thought I did something wrong to deserve the overwhelming darkness. I figured the only way I could end my pain was to take my own life.

 

Jul/Aug
2017

Get Comfortable in Your Skin: Reverse aging and scarring

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Written by By Trish Amundson

Walk down the skin care aisle at the store and you’ll find a multitude of over-the-counter products to cleanse and exfoliate your skin, treat acne, diminish wrinkles and age spots—and make you look younger every day. 

In your bathroom cabinet, many of these same products sit only partially used—with little or no results. When it comes to treating acne scars, age spots and more, it’s time to clean out the cabinet and turn to the professionals for a variety of specialty products and services that will help you achieve optimal results and be more comfortable being you.

FROM ACNE SCARS TO AGE SPOTS

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), acne scars can become more noticeable with aging as the skin loses collagen. Multiple treatments to reverse or minimize acne scars are available, depending on the patient’s needs. 

 

Jul/Aug
2017

H20: What do you know?

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Written by Emily Watkins; Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

Water is the foundation of life. We could not exist without it. The most important of all nutrition, water makes up between 55–60 percent of our body composition. Different cells contain different amounts of water. For example, bone is about 22 percent water, and muscle is about 75 Percent water. 

HOW WATER WORKS

Water has many important jobs. It dissolves and transports substances, catalyzes chemical reactions, lubricates tissues, regulates temperature and provides minerals. Without a good balance of fluids, we risk serious health issues and even death. 

 

Let’s talk about weight, a touchy subject. Before we dive in let’s talk about self love. In the last issue we discussed happiness and how to cultivate it. The same is true of loving and accepting ourselves as we are at any given moment.

While you may not be okay with the number on the scale, the process of change can be much easier if you appreciate your body for what it can do for you and not just what it looks like.

HEALTHY WEIGHT

It is true that many people are carrying around too much weight, and we see the consequences of that frequently in the rise of metabolic disorders, as well as an increase in back and joint pain.

 

Jul/Aug
2017

Yeast Infections: A quick guide to caring for yourself

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Written by Caitlin Summers

Women are becoming more comfortable talking about subjects that used to have a great deal of stigma behind them, such as periods and sex. However, there are still some topics we women would prefer not to talk about. 

Let’s discuss yeast infections. Don’t blush yet because it’s something an estimated 75 percent of women will have at least once. It may be that we are uncomfortable to talk about it because yeast infections are uncomfortable. I’ve had some painful cramps, but having an itch that we wouldn’t want people to see us scratch in public could be worse. Yeast infections happen, and there are ways that you can treat them right away and even prevent them. 

WHAT IS A YEAST INFECTION?

Yeast infections aren’t an STI. According to Judith Devorak, APRN, CNP of Olmsted Medical Center, “The yeast that causes it is a fungus named candida. This fungus normally lives in the gastrointestinal tract and sometimes in the vagina.” When bacterial changes happen, an overgrowth of the yeast can occur causing what’s known as a yeast infection. 

 

Jul/Aug
2017

Rowing: Girls growing in all areas of life

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Written by Holly Galbus

High school girls are discovering opportunities for physical, mental, social, and academic growth in the sport of rowing through the program at Rochester Rowing Club of Minnesota (RRCMN).

ROWING IN ROCHESTER

Founded in 1990, the RRCMN was originally a program for adults but has grown and expanded over the years, and in 2001, they added a Juniors program. During the last season, there were 10 high school girls on the team. Although their numbers are small, they have a fierce devotion to the sport of rowing and say the academic and personal growth opportunities have made it their sport of choice.

 

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