Mar/Apr
2017

The Art of Coaching: Teaching Life Skills on the Ice

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Written by Holly Galbus

The puck dropped for the first time for Rochester varsity girls hockey on November 14, 1995 at Graham Arena. There were two teams in that inaugural season, and the first games played were John Marshall versus Owatonna and Mayo versus Minnetonka.

Twenty-two years later, the game of hockey has become the sport of choice for many young women in our area.  The lessons learned extend beyond stickhandling, skating and passing the puck.  Gains in confidence, leadership and teamwork contribute to success on and off the ice.

COACHING PHILOSOPHIES

Bob Montrose, retired John Marshall Rockets girls hockey coach, says that in coaching, “It’s about surrounding players with a culture of really trying hard.” He says success on the ice is determined by essentially two things: keeping the energy level of the players up and having a skilled goalie. Keeping the energy level of the players up is about cultivating excitement for the game. This begins at the start of every practice, he says, with a fun, competitive game.  Mike McCormack has 31 years coaching experience and is in his third season as head coach of the Mayo Spartans girls hockey team.  Earlier this winter, the Spartans celebrated a win in overtime over crosstown rival the John Marshall Rockets, something that hasn’t been done in five years. “I’ve never seen a happier group of kids in my life,” he says. “For many, it was the most important hockey game in their life.”

 

Mar/Apr
2017

Body Contouring: Weight Loss and Skin Removal

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Written by Brittney Marschall

After losing a significant amount of weight, extra skin can make it difficult to manage a healthy, active lifestyle or a more sleek and toned appearance. Body contouring can remove excess skin and fat tissue from one or more areas of the abdomen, hips, buttocks, thighs, chest, arms or breasts. 

BODY CONTOURING CHOICES

Body contouring involves many choices. One of the most important is choosing a surgeon you can trust. There are several options here
in Rochester.

Olmsted Medical Center (OMC) offers reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Dr. Srdan Babovic and the newest member of the OMC plastic surgery department, Dr. Ghassan Mehio, share a passion for helping people look their best. Dr. Babovic has been a practicing plastic surgeon since 2000 and is named one of America’s Top Plastic Surgeons according to Consumers’ Research Council of America (Reconstructive Surgery Liposuction Facts, Tummy Tuck). OMC cooperates with other doctors and specialists in many medical groups, including Mayo Clinic and private practitioners. 

 

Mar/Apr
2017

Only Half (13.1) Crazy: Journey of Four Non-Traditional Runners

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Written by Stephanie J. Sawyer

Brenda Shamblin, Mandy Wanzek, Kathy Johnson and I were all acquaintances, and we have become very close friends over the past four years. Our journey started in 2012 when we met at Moms on the Run, a running group for moms of varying fitness levels. The program’s support system of coach and team community has been life-changing for many moms who said, “I couldn’t run around the block,” and are now running half marathons. This was true for us, and our group catapulted us into a world where we didn’t think we belonged. 

MOTIVATION

Last year, we decided to set a lofty goal. We signed up for the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon in Las Vegas, Nevada. We followed the Hal Higdon training plan for half marathon training. We did short runs during the week and long runs on the weekend. Time constraints were definitely the biggest challenge for us. We are all working moms, and carving out the time for training was difficult. We ran three mornings a week at 5:30 a.m. It wasn’t easy, but I can speak for all of us when I say it was well worth it.

 

Today, 8 million women in the United States are living with heart disease, and 35 million are at risk. According to American Heart Association, heart diseases cause one in three deaths in women.* Heart disease affects more women than men and is the leading cause of death in the nation. Fortunately, heart disease can often be prevented by making healthy choices and managing health conditions. During February—American Heart Month—and throughout the year, activities raise awareness and inform about the threat of heart disease.

LOCAL SYMPOSIUM EDUCATES AND EMPOWERS WOMEN WITH HEART DISEASE

Fifteen years ago, the Women’s Heart Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester and WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease in Washington, D.C. developed an education and advocacy program for women living with heart disease. The WomenHeart Science and Leadership Symposium at Mayo Clinic is the only national volunteer training program that prepares women with heart disease to be community educators, advocates, spokespersons and support network coordinators. 

 

I am a busy working mom, and like everyone, I want and need to eat good food for health, energy and well-being. As a personal trainer and fitness instructor, I also want to set a good example for my members and clients. But I also really love to eat. I love to try new foods and share food with others, and it’s one of the ways I show my family that I love them.

Gone are the days of leisurely grocery shopping and sipping a glass of wine while chopping and sautéing. Now I work until 5:30 p.m. or later most nights, and then the kids have sports, which means we have a very small window in which to prepare and scarf down supper. 

Like most families, we are on a budget, which means that eating out every night just isn’t in the cards. So how can we feed our families healthy food with time and budget limitations?

 

As we head into National Children’s Dental Health Month in February, it comes time to set the record straight about dental health. Katie Post, DDS, of Northwest Dental Group says only 60 percent of the population goes to a dentist on a regular basis. With the remaining 40 percent uninformed, there are some dental health myths to correct.

Those teeth-whitening toothpastes? Not the answer, Post says. Duration of brushing your teeth, two times per day? Two minutes each session. Gatorade? Worse for your teeth than Mountain Dew. As for when kids should start brushing, Post says the earlier the better so children get accustomed to “you being in their mouth.” Once older, there’s no great time to introduce teeth brushing. “As soon as they can run from you, they will,” Post remarks.

HITTING THE STREETS (OR SCHOOLS)

Post promotes Children’s Dental Health Month by going to several elementary schools and daycares to talk to kids. She tells them how to properly brush their teeth, talks about the “mean” sugar bug that causes cavities, and allows kids to play with dental instruments and tools. She also discusses what path kids should follow if they’re interested in the dentistry field.

 

Participation in the sport of cross-country skiing has increased for high school girls in the last several years. Of the 178 students registered with the Rochester Nordic Ski Team (RNST), 110 are female.  

Paul Ehling, district representative of RNST, says most girls on the team pursue lettering with their high school athletics department, a symbol of commitment and hard work for students. Cross-country skiing is one of the sports a high school girl may letter in after meeting requirements, which include attending practices and competitions, participating in community service and demonstrating proficiency in ski techniques.  

TEAM BEGINNINGS AND SEASON SCHEDULE

With RNST, students from Rochester area schools in grades 7-12 learn a form of cross-country skiing known as skate skiing. Along the trail they often develop a love for the sport that can be enjoyed for a lifetime.

RNST was founded in 2001 by Henry Walker, Darald Bothum and Michael O’Connor.  It was originally a community education offering, but because interest in the sport grew, the team is now hosted by Rochester Active Sports Club.

 

Nov/Dec
2016

Sparkles from Ruthie: One Woman's Journey Through Depression

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Written by Terri Allred Photography by Fagan Studios

The concept is so simple, even a child can do it. Every time you see a sparkly object, take a moment to do a self-assessment. Ask yourself, “How am I feeling today?” Ruth Braun Tibesar hopes that this daily prompt and reflection will become a regular practice for all of us.

RUTH'S JOURNEY

Ruth is a survivor of depression and is a mental health wellness speaker who shares her story in the hope that she can make a difference for someone else. Ruth’s journey began about seven years ago when she was making weekly trips to Mankato to take care of her ill mother. Despite having a loving husband and supportive coworkers and family, she shouldered much of the burden of managing her mother’s care. She was working full time as a laboratory technologist at Mayo Clinic during the week and acting as her mother’s full-time caregiver on the weekends.

 

Nov/Dec
2016

Tessa Leen's Weight Loss Journey: 40,000 Instagram Followers and 6,500 Facebook Fans

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Written by Emily Watkins Photography by Mike Hardwick Photography

According to the CDC, over 70 percent of American adults are considered overweight or obese. These conditions correspond with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders, especially osteoarthritis, as well as some cancers. Taking the steps to lose weight is not as easy as we wish.

Tessa Leen lost weight in a smart and safe way. Exercise and healthy eating led her to lose 185 pounds in 4 years. 

DESIRE TO LOSE WEIGHT

Tessa says that she was always the “chubby kid.” She was teased, and that led to unhealthy methods of losing weight in high school and college. After getting married, she and her husband had two children in quick succession. Throughout both pregnancies, Tessa gained weight, getting to her heaviest known weight of 331 pounds in the summer of 2012.  

 

Sep/Oct
2016

Walking School Bus: Healthy, Safe and Social

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Written by Gina Dewink

Only 16 percent of our nation’s children walk or bike to school, down from 42 percent a generation ago. Other countries, such as Australia and England, have been coordinating groups of children to walk to school together for a decade or more. these days, Rochester is receiving state recognition for its very own Walking School Bus.

Simplicity of Walking

A Walking School Bus is a group of neighborhood children walking together to school. The group is supervised by volunteer parents, referred to as “drivers.” JoAnne Judge-Dietz works for the Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP), which strives to help Minnesotans lead longer, healthier lives. Judge-Dietz says a Walking School Bus is “a simple concept, but one we have lost over time. We forget how simple and smart it is to walk.”

 

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Copyright 2016