Mar/Apr
2019

Beyond Self-Esteem: Know your worth

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Written by Terri Allred

There are certain words and concepts that are so overused in our culture that they end up meaning everything and nothing at all. Self-esteem is one such concept. Poor self-esteem is thought to be the cause of everything from childhood behavioral problems to adult interpersonal difficulties. Esteem for oneself is surely a contributing factor for a host of issues; however, many researchers are beginning to question the concept of self-esteem and the importance of it in successful adult identity and relationship formation. Instead, the idea of self-worth is emerging as a more helpful concept for explaining the sense of value in self and relationships that is so often missing in people’s lives.  

 

Mar/Apr
2019

Pam Mensik: A woman with passion and purpose

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Written by Erin Pagel

Passionate: That’s Pam Mensink. She is passionate about her family. Her face beams and her eyes light up when she speaks of her grandchildren. Mensink is passionate about the Rochester community. She is a member of the Sunrisers Kiwanis Club where she is active in the club’s purpose of improving the well-being of youth and elderly people in Rochester. Mensink is passionate about her job at Madonna Meadows Assisted Living Community, where she supports residents and families during what can be a challenging transition to assisted living.  

 

Mar/Apr
2019

Get a Coach: Live your best life

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Written by Denise Stegall

Health coaching has been recognized as one of the fastest growing careers of the decade and the fastest growing source of employment in our economy. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, health coaching is expected to grow 21.9 percent by 2022.   

The medical community recognizes the power and value of health coaching. Dr. Mark Hyman and Dr. Dean Ornish, both well-known thought leaders in the world of health and wellness, believe that “lifestyle medicine” or “lifestyle change” is the future of health care.

 

Mar/Apr
2019

Refinancing your home: Why refinance and the steps to take

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Written by Alison Rentschler

You may have heard refinancing a home is a good idea when interest rates are down or you want to do some home improvements. Find out from some local experts about why you should consider refinancing, when might be a good time and where to go for more information about refinancing.  

 

I can easily spend hours in lighting stores. The textures, finishes and shapes mesmerize me. Sometimes my husband gives me a look, cueing me that we’ve been under the lights too long. Like a child getting kicked off an iPad, I try to soak up every remaining minute. I completely understand why someone would choose a career in lighting because it’s where form meets function.  

I’ve had the privilege of speaking with three Rochester women who work in the lighting industry: Becky Holmen, Ami Olson and Heather Hughes. They’ve been able to combine their knowledge of lighting with their love of people. Their insights may even pique the interest of anyone looking for a “bright” career.

 

Nov/Dec
2018

Sisters Forever: Linked by Heart and Spirit

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Written by Trish Amundson

MANY SISTERS HAVE A SPECIAL BOND THAT GROWS STRONGER OVER TIME. Tami Berg and Lisa Thorson have an incredible and ever-growing connection with their sister, Meg Hawks, even though they just met her last year. Now united, the three women are connected not only by paternal roots, but by similar characteristics, interests and love of family. They are sisters by blood—and sisters by heart.  

Dream Come True
Tami, a professor and director of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Winona State University, grew up with her biological sister, Lisa. “I had no idea I had another sister until I did an Ancestry.com DNA test,” says Tami. She had questions about her ethnic background. “It came back with a ‘first order relative’ match, so a little detective work began.” 

The genealogy website linked Tami to Meg in Nebraska. She also had tested her DNA. “I remember getting the message from Tami asking if I knew how we could be related,” says Meg, who also works in education as a school secretary. Adopted at birth, she had limited information but knew her birth dad was a salesman and her birth mother had relatives in Italy. “I just wanted to know my ethnicity. I figured I would never find out about my father.”  

 

THANKSGIVING IS A TIME FOR REFLECTION, GRATITUDE AND GIVING. This is especially true for Jean Voxland, her husband, Andrew, and her birth parents, Dennis “Denny” and Karen Vinar. With a new and profound appreciation for each other, they continue to get to know one another.  

The couples are inspiring others through recounted experiences in their recent book, “How Did You Find Me…After All These Years? A Family Memoir.” Jean explains, “We documented our story for future generations. We felt it was important to write down how we felt at this point in our lives and how far we have all come in getting together.”

Young Love
Denny and Karen began dating when he was 15 and she was 13. They fell in love, but when Karen became pregnant at the age of 15, she went to a home for unwed mothers. Baby Denise (later named Jean) was born in August 1961 and placed for adoption. 

 

SINCE THE BEGINNING OF TIME, WOMEN HAVE BRAVELY AND TIRELESSLY FOUGHT TO ASSERT THEIR POSITIONS AS EXPERTS, TRAILBLAZERS AND INNOVATORS. FROM COCO CHANEL TO MARIE CURIE, NORA EPHRON TO ROSA PARKS, MAYA ANGELOU TO ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, THESE INSPIRATIONAL LEADERS SHARE A COMMON BOND: THEY DID NOT LET FEAR, DOUBT OR CONSEQUENCE INHIBIT THEIR ABILITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIP

From elementary school class elections to the race for the White House, people want to understand what ensures success as a leader. But what often goes unrecognized is that there are many different visions of what constitutes a successful leader.

Imagine if each of the women above had followed the exact same – path to “successful leadership.” They may not have achieved all that they did or have as much of an impact on the world. What made them incredible leaders were their unique dreams, talents, goals, influences, opportunities and many other qualities that each possessed and shared with others.

 

THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY OFFERS EXCEPTIONAL CAREERS FOR WOMEN, PARTICULARLY WOMEN WANTING TO MAKE AN IMPACT IN THEIR COMMUNITIES WHILE CONNECTING WITH PEOPLE. A CAREER IN REAL ESTATE OFTEN COMBINES PERSONAL INTERACTION, SALES, INTEGRITY AND BUSINESS SKILLS. REAL ESTATE IS A SERVICE INDUSTRY THAT REQUIRES CURRENT SKILLS, LEARNING ABOUT THE REAL ESTATE FIELD
AND NETWORKING. 

While many first think of real estate agents when considering the industry, there are numerous other careers in real estate. Appraisers, inspectors, loan officers and attorneys, just to name a few, are essential to the transaction. 

Real Estate Agent

Guiding a client through the home buying or selling process is the general job description of a real estate agent. The career focuses on helping people and getting to know what clients want to achieve by buying or selling property. Real estate agents help buyers find the perfect home and sellers find the right buyer. It is through agents or attorneys that buyers and sellers work out agreements for a property. 

 

Jul/Aug
2018

TRANSGENDERISM: A PARENT’S PERSPECTIVE

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Written by ERIN PAGEL, Photography By ADMIRE PHOTO

“AS A MOTHER, I WANT MY KIDS TO BE HAPPY, IN VIABLE RELATIONSHIPS AND PRODUCTIVE MEMBERS OF SOCIETY,” SAYS ROCHESTER MOTHER OF TWO, BARB ERICKSON. ERICKSON ADDS THAT HER CHILDREN, NOW ADULTS, HAVE ALWAYS BEEN TRUE TO THEMSELVES. THIS IS ONE OF THE MANY THINGS SHE LOVES ABOUT THEM, AND THESE ARE SENTIMENTS MOST PARENTS CAN RELATE TO AND RALLY BEHIND.

COMING OUT

When her daughter came out as a lesbian in high school, Erickson asked blunt, clarifying questions to understand her daughter’s reality. She was seeking to understand, support and learn. Erickson adjusted her expectations. “Raising a daughter sets us up for eventually ending up with a son-in-law. Well, OK, no son-in-law, but that’s fine,” she remembers thinking.

Later, when her daughter’s girlfriend came out as transgender in college, Erickson again asked blunt, clarifying questions to understand the reality of their lives. Listening to the couple’s struggles and undeterred hope for the future was a turning point for Erickson. The revelation gave her an opportunity to re-evaluate her thinking around transgenderism and what she expected of her children. When the couple announced their engagement to be married, Erickson realized that she would have a son-in-law after all. “It was very emotional,” remembers Erickson. She was assimilating into a world that can be filled with hate, disbelief and pain. Soon married, her daughter and son-in-law were already in that world.

 

 

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