Jan/Feb
2018

Costa Rica, Baby!

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Written by Dawn Sanborn

A BEAUTIFUL WEEK COME TRUE

For several years now, my daughter and I have taken a vacation together around the time of my birthday in January—a welcome reprieve from the brutal  MINNESOTA winters. In January 2017, we headed to the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica.

GETTING THERE

Our travel there took a long time and included both a plane and a bus ride. We arrived after dark in Cahuito, the resort town we were staying in, and we were famished. 

 

Jan/Feb
2018

Community Begins with Coffee

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Written by Joy Blewett

Six local coffee shops inspire Rochester.

We love coffee. More than coffee, though, we love a welcoming environment in which to drink coffee, engage in great conversation and build community. Around Rochester there are coffee shops with unique appeal and flair  with missions to build community. 

DUNN BROTHERS COFFEE

I first met Rochester Women magazine Publisher Jorrie Johnson at Dunn Brothers Coffee on South Broadway. As a Rochester Greeter representative, she welcomed me and another gal to the city with a packet of goodies and wonderful conversation.  I learned that she was managing editorial content for Rochester Women magazine, and she learned that I was an aspiring writer. 

Dunn Brothers is known for its imported coffee from around the world, as well as in-house roasting. Dennis and Lynn Wong own the three Dunn Brothers Coffee locations in Rochester, as well as Zumbro River Catering. Their location on Elton Hills has a large cafe and is known for their breakfasts with fresh eggs and quality Boar’s Head meats. When I was new to Rochester, this location became a great comfort to me. Using their Wi-Fi, I stayed in touch with family when I didn’t have internet service at my house, and I enjoyed food and drinks in front of a cozy fireplace. Since then I have enjoyed breakfast or coffee with friends, and taken in the local artists’ work showcased on their walls.

 

Jan/Feb
2018

Flock of Readers

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Written by Anna Matetic

ROCHESTER PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK GROUPS

Lynette Perry, an adult program coordinator at the Rochester Public Library, meets me in a conference room on the second floor of the library. It seems a large space for a book group, but it is the perfect size for the Night Owl book group. “I currently have 24 people in it,” says Perry. “My max was 27 at one point.” 

DIFFERERNT TYPES OF BOOK GROUPS

While members of the Night Owl book group read the same book, other groups pick a theme instead of a specific book. The Mystery book group is one of these.

 “They might all read a cozy mystery set in a bed and breakfast,” says Perry. “They can all find one that they want and read it and then talk about the ones that they read.” There is even a cookbook group where members find a recipe and bring the food to the meeting.

“It’s a great way for people to share their interests and their time with the library and with other people,” she says. There are currently eight different book groups run by the library.

 

Jan/Feb
2018

The Kindness Diaries

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Written by Joy Blewett

Leon Logothetis quit his corporate desk job and headed out across the world seeking kindness. He not only found kindness given to him, but he gave kindness. Logothetis wanted to discover if there were actually kind humans still out there.

“The Kindness Diaries” book and Netflix series (released in 2015) is changing the way people see each other, as well as what it means to show kindness to one another. Logothetis’ adventures take us across the world to different cultures, different climates, but with one thing all in common—humanity. 

KINDNESS IN STEWARTVILLE

As part of “The Kindness Diaries” book tour, Logothetis gave a presentation in Stewartville on August 30, 2017, organized by REACH coordinator James Parry of Stewartville High School and Middle School. About 200 people gathered in the Stewartville Performing Arts Center for this event. 

 

Nov/Dec
2017

Compassion

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Written by By Jorrie Johnson

Our City of Rochester’s resolution to be a compassionate city was signed on September 18, 2017. On Sunday, October 22, 2017, “People of all faiths and cultures were invited to experience diverse practices of compassion for the purpose of weaving healing and peace in our fractured world.” It was gorgeous Sunday afternoon, with rays of sunshine lighting the auditorium at Assisi Heights. Young and old, men and women, police officers and citizens, students and teachers, African, Asian, Caucasian, Indian and American were gathered for discussions around compassion. It was a pleasure to be surrounded by so much hope and peace in one room.

I lost a $50 Cub Foods gift card that my mom gave to my son for his birthday. I felt feelings of loss and disappointment. My 12-year-old son was silent as we walked, looking around on the ground, kicking the leaves hoping it was hiding underneath. He was really looking forward to going to the grocery store to buy whatever he wanted. I, too, was excited to have some extra funds to fill our cupboards with after-school snacks and maybe even a fine bottle of olive oil. This afternoon, I went to the grocery store to buy some ramen noodles (12 for $2.99) for after school snacks and supplies to make a huge crockpot of chili; however, I did not buy the olive oil. What I appreciate about today’s experience is being reminded of how it feels to want food, but not having the money. I am also reminded how forgiveness is a gift; he still loves me despite me losing his gift card. 

Beth Kosta and the crew at Community Food Response don’t ask questions when someone is in need of food (see page 21). They collect food from area restaurants to give without judgment. I have a couple of friends who volunteer with CFR regularly. In fact, Danielle Teal invited me to volunteer with her at CFR one Monday evening a few years ago. Times like those, when I am making a difference, I feel really good about myself. I love helping other people, and it makes me realize I do have so much and so much to offer. You, too, can make a difference in the lives other others through Community Food Response, The Salvation Army, United Way of Olmsted County, your faith community or service organization. 

In this Issue of Rochester Women magazine, we provide some ways to help you enjoy the holidays. When you are looking for the right holiday outfit, check out Samantha Erickson’s guide to surviving holiday fashion (page 15). If you’re not sure what to give someone this holiday season, read my holiday gift making and buying guide (pages 16-17). As you gather with your friends and family over the holiday season, remember to keep it simple. Try Emily Watkin’s beef brisket and punch recipes (page 28).

We hope you’ll join us on the trolley for Ladies Day Out to Olde Fashioned Christmas in Mantorville on Saturday, December 2 (see page 48). May you enjoy good friends and good cheer through the rest of this year!

With love,

Jorrie

 

Nov/Dec
2017

The Jive Mill: Connecting Audience with Musician

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Written by Written and Photos By Joy Blewett

THE JIVE MILL IS A NEW MUSIC VENUE ON NORTH BROADWAY IN ROCHESTER WHERE I WITNESSED AN INVITE MIc—A PLANNED EVENT WHERE MUSICIANS OR SPOKEN WORD ARTISTS ARE GIVEN A THEME OR TOPIC TO WRITE AND PERFORM ON. The JIVE MILL HOSTS invite mic events ALONG WITH A VARIETY OF MUSICAL GROUPS. 

THE JOURNEY

The Jive Mill, which opened its doors in June, began in 2012 as a house concert at the home of Noelle Tripolino Roberts, owner, and her husband, Christopher Roberts, manager. With the help of Joshua Poencet managing the physical space of the building and Carsten Earl creating ambience with lighting and sound, this team has created an experience between musician and audience that must not be missed. 

 

Nov/Dec
2017

I Am a Beautiful Rochester Woman: Christine Abel

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Written by By Emily Watkins Photos by Tracey McGuire Photography

Christine Abel Maintains a positive outlook on life despite managing a busy household, experiencing the loss of her father and more recently the loss of a love.

Sitting across the table from Christine Abel at breakfast the morning of her makeover, I got the impression that this is a woman who never stops moving and helping others. 

It was hard to get her to talk about herself, but Christine had lots to say about her children who are 18, 16 and 12 and spend a lot of their time helping others as well. Her son, who is in college for law enforcement, “should be a farmer,” Christine says, but he feels like he could best contribute to society by being in law enforcement. Her 16-year-old daughter, who is currently representing as Miss Gladiola Days Queen 2017, is passionate about cancer research. Christine and her family have watched family and friends suffer from and succumb to cancer, and her daughter is dedicating her campaign to fund cancer research. 

A WELL-ROUNDED (AND BUSY) LIFE

Christine was born in Rochester, Minnesota, and has lived in the surrounding area her entire life. She says, “Minnesota is a fabulous place of seasonal changes. I adore the rolling hills, streams and lakes.” She loves biking, hiking at Whitewater State Park and traveling as much as possible. She is also a history buff. Her family has a lot of history in the military, so she knows a lot about soldier etiquette at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington Cemetery, as well as the Vietnam Memorial in Washington D.C.

 

Nov/Dec
2017

Yes, You DO Have Something to Wear!

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Written by A guide to surviving holiday fashion. By Samantha Erickson Photos by Katie Staige

HOW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU STOOD IN FRONT OF YOUR CLOSET CURSING THE FACT THAT YOU HAVE NOTHING TO WEAR? ODDS ARE, IN THE 62 DAYS BETWEEN HALLOWEEN AND NEW YEAR’S DAY, YOU’LL BE INVITED TO MORE EVENTS THAN THE ENTIRE REST OF THE YEAR. 

Keeping up with a great new outfit for each gathering is exhausting and unrealistic. If just thinking about the pressure to look great and keep a jolly attitude this season already has you burned out, the good news is that you’re not alone, and help has arrived. EverydayMae.com is a new Rochester-based blog to show you how planning and creativity will take you from fall family photos to ringing in 2018 with style. 

TRY IT ON

Nothing is worse than mentally piecing together an outfit, only to find just hours (or within the hour) before your party that the look doesn’t come together or worse, doesn’t fit. Now is the time to try on all of your seasonal pieces. Nail down your basic “holiday look” and try any fun new trends ahead of time.

 

Nov/Dec
2017

Gift Giving: Share Gifts, Make Memories and Shop Local

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Written by By Jorrie Johnson Photography by Fagan Studios

What does gift giving mean to you? Do you enjoy giving of yourself, your time and your talents, or do you prefer purchasing gifts to wrap with a big red bow and put under the tree? Gift giving shows someone that you value them and who they are. 

The gifts we give are a reflection of what makes us feel loved. According to Gary Chapman, author of “The 5 Love Languages,” there are five main ways that people speak and understand emotional love: words of affirmation, quality time, receiving gifts, acts of service and physical touch. For a good relationship, it is important for the giver to know how the receiver feels loved, what speaks to them.     

GIFTS AND TALENTS

Do you knit, garden, write or sing? No matter your talent, you can probably share that with a friend or two or the whole community. It’s fun to take a class to learn a new skill and then share your result. There are art classes, music, cooking and canning classes through community education, specialty shops or learning centers that you can take or give the class fee and supplies as a gift for any age. 

 

Do you junk? If not, after looking at all the amazing things that Sue Whitney has created and restored from junk, you will want to. Whitney is a celebrity in our midst, having appeared multiple times on NBC’s “The Today Show,” as well as HGTV’s “Country Style.” She has published three books, served as editor-at-large and columnist for “Country Home Magazine” and as a contributing editor for Better Homes and Garden’s “Country Gardens” magazine. 

SAVING THE PLANET ONE DIY PROJECT AT A TIME

In short, Whitney is a trusted author, and her new book “Junk Beautiful: Furniture Refreshed” will not disappoint. Learn how to refinish antique furniture or create a unique piece out of a thrift store purchase. Whitney says, “We’re a throw-away culture,” and this book will teach you how to reuse and recycle to avoid buying cookie-cutter items from big box stores.

 

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