May/Jun
2017

Of Girls and Horses: Lettering in Equestrian

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Written by Holly Galbus

Equestrian is one of the newest lettering opportunities in sports for high school girls. The program, written and proposed to the Rochester Public School district by Susan Austin and Eliese Klennert, is now in its second year.

THE SPORT OF EQUESTRIAN

Eliese Klennert, owner of The Stables Equestrian Center, is a certified riding instructor and coach. She volunteers her time as advisor for the Rochester Public School District’s Equestrian Club. 

Klennert says equestrian is a physical and mental sport. “Coaches say 90 percent of riding is between your ears, meaning it’s mentally challenging. You might be dealing with a horse who is having a bad day. Also, your teammate (the horse) doesn’t speak your language. So, along with developing the physical skills needed in the sport, riders learn to communicate with the horse.” Klennert explains the sport is also physically demanding, as riders need to “own their own body” and be able to influence the horse, a 1,200-pound animal who isn’t always interested in following the rider’s signals.

 

In 2014, Connie Hawley quit her job as an aviation security inspector to open up an artistic, one-of-a-kind shoe shop in Zumbrota. She found herself driving down the main street and noticed a “For Lease” sign on one of the buildings. She jotted down the phone number and made the call. After that, she found out that things have a way of coming together at just the right time. 

“Everything fell into place. Once I made the decision, the universe conspired to help me do just that,” Hawley reflects.

LUYA SHOES AND OTHER FINE THINGS

Connie sells more than shoes in her shop, although shoes have always been her first love and main passion. She sells accessories from around the world and from local artists. 

 

May/Jun
2017

Things Moms Love (But Kids Hate)

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Written by Erin Pagel

As a mom or having been a child, you are likely familiar with things kids love but moms hate (I’m looking at you, Play-Doh). Moms also encounter things that they love and kids hate. Do any on this list resonate with you?

SHOPPING FOR CLOTHES

There are moms who love to shop till they drop. It’s a scavenger hunt for that perfect item to make the trip a success. They love it. Not kids. If you’ve taken a preteen shopping for anything other than athletic socks, you may agree. Between the eye rolling and sighs of discontent, there is little actual shopping done, and it is far from fun (for anyone).

 

Mar/Apr
2017

Let's Céilí

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Written by Jorrie Johnson

I attended my first céilí on St. Patrick's Day eve, Wednesday, March 16, 2016 at the Rochester Art Center, in collaboration with Irish Fest of Rochester, Minnesota. Nearing the spring equinox, the late afternoon sun shone brightly through the windows on the first floor of the Art Center as folks of all ages, dressed in green, gathered. I wore the only dress I own with green on it, which happens to be one of my favorite dresses and tall black boots for the celebration. Megan Johnston, executive director of the Rochester Art Center, opened the evening with a presentation on Irish art history. Then, we all ate Irish stew and soda bread and socialized. About 8 p.m. the céilí (kay-lee) dancing started, led by Twin Cities Céilí Band, along with the adorable singing, dancing, storytelling and bodhran (Celtic frame drum) player, Máirtín de Cógáin. I paid the price of wearing those boots the next day, but I had so much fun dancing with everyone at the céilí. I plan on going again this year at Bleu Duck. See the céilí article on page 13. 

Rochester Women magazine celebrates National Women’s History (which we have termed “Herstory”) month in March by featuring local author Sister Ellen Whelan, Ph.D., and her books “The Sisters’ Story,” Parts One and Two. Rochester would not be where it is today if not for the bold, kind, compassionate, independent and strong Franciscan Sisters of Assisi Heights. Read about them on page 20.

 

Megan Halland is from Australia. When her husband was offered an advanced fellowship at Mayo Clinic in 2013, they moved to the United States. They have lived in Rochester for three and a half years. She says, “(My husband) has his dream job here, so we have bought a house and are staying HERE indefinitely.”

Megan explains how she met her husband, “My husband is from Norway. He moved to (Newcastle,) Australia following high school to study medicine. We met at university there.” Megan was working for the department of health and undertaking postgraduate studies. “We had an evening epidemiology lecture (where we met). Magnus waited at a friend’s house one evening to purposely arrive late to the lecture so that he could make sure he arrived after I did and come and sit next to me. He invited me on a date, and we have been happy ever after.” That was in 2003. They got married in 2005 and have three children: Isobel, 8, Lochlan, 6, and Sofie, 5. 

MOM AND DAUGHTER MAKEOVERS

One Monday afternoon in October 2016, Megan scheduled herself for make-up by Katie Kirckoff at Glam Beauty Lounge. Then she had her photos taken in Peace Plaza by Tracey McGuire. 

 

Mar/Apr
2017

Céilí: Celebrating Old Country Style

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Written by Alison Rentschler Photos by Dawn Sanborn Photography

A "céilí” or “céilidh” is an Irish or Scottish social dance. Avin Honecker Sherman, fitness and dance instructor, explains, “It tends to refer to a dance like we refer to a square dance, with formations. Some dances tend to be in long lines. Many dances are influenced by Irish dancing. It’s like a barn dance.” 

In Rochester, céilí dances are held twice a year, around St. Patrick’s Day and during Irish Fest on Labor Day weekend. Put on your dancing shoes because there will be a pre-St. Patrick’s Day céilí hosted by Irish Fest on Friday, March 10 at the Bleu Duck Kitchen in downtown Rochester.

LOCAL CÉILÍ DANCERS AND CALLERS

In céilí dances, a group of people dances together, and each dance is led by a caller. Sherman, who is often a caller for céilí dances in the area, says, “A caller teaches you and tells you what to do. With céilí dancing, you can walk this dance or do an Irish step. You can count 1-2-3, and you hop. It’s similar in different dance styles.”

 

Mar/Apr
2017

The Beauty of Giving and Receiving: Stylists Embrace the Gift of Life through Kidney Transplants

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Written by Trish Amundson Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

The month of March—National Kidney Month—calls attention to kidney disease, raising awareness about kidney health, prevention of kidney disease and lifesaving treatments. It’s the perfect time to learn more about the need for organ donors and transplant options. For local hair stylists and 15-year colleagues Katie Chapman and Sonja Kalis, it’s an opportunity to reflect on their experience of giving and receiving the gift of life.

PREPARING FOR THE WORST

Three years ago, Sonja was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and told she would need a kidney transplant. “I thought it would be many years down the road,” she recalls. “But 18 months later, they told me I had to have it sooner rather than later.” 

The seriousness of her medical situation became more real than ever before. Her name went on the transplant list, a long list of individuals waiting for a kidney from a deceased donor. Unfortunately, many patients with kidney failure end up on dialysis before they reach the top of the list—before a transplant is possible. 

 

Mar/Apr
2017

Gaining Ground: Women in Politics

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Written by Sarah Oslund

Regardless of which side of the political aisle you sit on, the desire for a more balanced representation of women in public policy-making positions is shared by many (men and women). From Minnesota to the Middle East, women are taking action like we haven’t seen in decades, if ever, to be heard and fight for justice. 

BALANCING ACT

Even though women make up more than half of the U.S. population, they remain underrepresented in Congress, holding only 20 percent of the seats. At the beginning of 2017, sources at Emerging America state that women comprise less than 25 percent of seats in state legislatures, 10 percent of all governors and 18 percent of mayors in cities with more than 30,000 residents. 

Research indicates that while women in political races are elected to office at the same rate as men, the recruitment rate for women is drastically lower. They often don’t even reach the proverbial pipeline. Since the election in November 2016, EMILY’s List, She Should Run and other groups that encourage women to seek public office have seen an unprecedented rise in interest.

 

What are your financial goals? Do you want to travel? Buy a car? Donate money to a charity you love? Be able to gift money to your children or grandchildren? Do you own a business and are thinking about succession planning? Do you want to buy your first house or a new house? Do you want to make sure you don’t have to worry about money when you retire? Saying “having enough for retirement” is vague. As with all goals, be specific.

LET YOUR VALUES GUIDE YOUR GOALS

Kari Douglas, financial advisor with Echelon Wealth Partners, a private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., helps women identify their values as they create financial goals. Kari says, “It is never too late or too early to start planning for financial well-being; it all begins with identifying your personal goals and objectives.” 

Kari encourages women to set goals, do their homework, admit they don’t know about investing, ask for help, take appropriate risks and focus on the long term. She says, “Women who have a financial plan feel the most confident and in control, are 10 times more likely to achieve said goal and are also more likely to feel at peace with their financial choices.”

 

Mar/Apr
2017

To Be Seventeen Again: Celebrating Eryn Fjelsted's 17th Birthday

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Written by Jorrie Johnson Photography by Mike Hardwick Photography

Do you remember turning 17? Where did you live? Where did you go to school? Who were your friends? What were your hopes and dreams? What advice would you give your 17 year-old self today?

ERYN'S 17TH BIRTHDAY PARTY

Rochester Women magazine helped Eryn Fjelsted celebrate her 17th birthday on Tuesday, February 7 with a makeover, pizza party and photo shoot at Pasquale’s Neighborhood Pizzeria. Imagine that kind of treatment for your 17th birthday party! 

Eryn and her mom, Cindy Fjelstad, went to Hair Studio 52 + Day Spa to get ready for the party. Jade at Hair Studio 52 added color and highlights to Cindy’s professional hairstyle. Lizzie Albrecht trimmed and highlighted Eryn’s hair to give her an easy wash-and-wear hair style for her busy, hockey-girl lifestyle. Her natural Norwegian blonde hair goes well with her light blue dress from Camy Couture. Her tall boots looked stunning on her long legs. Only a 17 year-old could get away with wearing a short dress, as if Paris runway model, on a chilly winter day in Minnesota. Teens don’t seem to have the same desire (or need) to be warm as their mothers.

 

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