Nov/Dec
2018

Anxiety: Recognizing and reducing symptoms in children

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Written by Tiffany Hansen

“ANXIETY” IS AN INCREASINGLY POPULAR CONCERN IN CONVERSATION IN THE DEVELOPED WORLD. Only one word in English serves for both the normal sense of anxiety and the psychiatric sense. In spite of growing attempts, the true definition, causes, types, expressions and treatments of anxiety disorders remains blurred.  

EARLY RECOGNITION AND REGULATING STRESS  

The explosion in recent findings regarding anxiety causes and treatment delays, points to a clear need for earlier recognition. The results of a recent study published by the National Institutes of Health reports that the average amount of time between onset of mental illness and seeking treatment is 10 years. Why is there such a delay? Delay in seeking treatment is complex. Depending on many structures of our society, simply identifying anxiety in younger populations, has the potential to make a great difference.  

 

Nov/Dec
2018

Happy to Help Others: Why help out during the Holidays?

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Written by Tiffany Hansen

HELPING OUT DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON HAS ENDLESS BENEFITS FOR YOU, YOUR FAMILY AND YOUR COMMUNITY. There is no better time to begin good habits of giving for the year to come, than during the season of giving. In the Rochester area, there is a great array of opportunities for you and your group to give. Volunteering is an especially great opportunity for families and friends to spend time together, stay active during the cold winter months and feel good about improving the lives of others.

GIVING TIME AND MONEY 

Donating items and volunteering takes more time than giving money. But being more involved increases the fun, and you can more easily see the direct impact of your contribution. In the words of Anne Frank, “No one has ever become poor by giving.” The "Journal of Health and Social Behavior" found over 90 percent of people report volunteering improves their mood, makes their community a better place and enriches their sense of purpose in life. 

 

STUMPED ON SECRET SANTA IDEAS? NEED A HOSTESS GIFT? ATTEND THE FIFTH ANNUAL FEAST! Local Foods Marketplace, December 1, 2018, Mayo Civic Center, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. With treasures locally sourced and crafted by over 100 food artisans, Feast! features culinary gifts sure to impress everyone from Bob in accounting to your child’s third-grade teacher. For only $8, you can sample everything before you buy and watch cooking demonstrations. Supporting the local economy never tasted so good.   

Check out a few of our FEAST! favorites at the event or on their websites. Visit local-feast.org for a complete list of exhibitors.

Maple Syrup from B&E’s Trees

B&E’s Trees is offering a bourban barrel-aged maple syrup as beautiful as it is delicious. Produced on an off-grid farm in Viroqua, Wisconsin, this pancake topper’s smoky vanilla tones (with hints of bourbon) enhances everything from carrots to cocktails. For more information visit BandEsTrees.com. 

 

START YOUR CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS THIS YEAR BY REKINDLING THE WARMTH OF HOLIDAYS PAST.  A Victorian Christmas is brought to life in the sights, sounds and tastes at Plainview’s Olde Fashioned Christmas, December 1 and 2.  

The event, organized each year by the Plainview Lions Club, is attended by nearly 3,000 people from the area. “It’s a very merry time, very festive," says Dan Schmitz, president of the Lions Club. This year marks the 25th anniversary of Olde Fashioned Christmas, and organizers say they are planning some special surprises to celebrate.

BEGINNINGS
Plainview’s Olde Fashioned Christmas officially began in 1993 when a group of four townspeople, led by Ted Zabel, had the idea to expand upon wagon rides that were a Plainview Christmastime tradition for several years. Sally Harrington, one of those townspeople, recalls, “We all had young families at the time, and the kids had a ball helping out. In the beginning it was simple and short, but as the years went on, we drew in different parts of the community.” The first few years, attendees could visit a Victorian Christmas scene at the historic home of Curt and Sue Buck, located on Fourth Street. There was a choir singing carols, and Santa and Mrs. Claus were in the public library, awaiting guests. 

 

Nov/Dec
2018

How Digital Stole Christmas: New Traditions

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Written by Gina Dewink

CERTAIN THINGS ABOUT THE HOLIDAYS HAVE ENDURED FOR GENERATIONS–CLASSIC SONGS, TRADITIONAL DECORATIONS AND BAKING. But take it from an accidental millennial, things have changed a lot since my childhood in the 80s and 90s. And as I watch my own little ones enjoying the magic of the season, I can’t help but notice all the ways our digital world has altered the childhood experience.  

Rudolph On Demand
Remember when you had to vigilantly wait for weeks for Christmas specials to air? And then when you finally knew the date, time and channel, you had to help your parents finagle the VHS recorder if you wanted to watch it more than once? Today, at any time of year, at any moment, our kids can conjure up and watch nearly any special you can imagine. No waiting. No screaming at your brother for changing the channel. It’s just there. And for most of us, we don’t even have cable television anymore. Can you imagine not watching holiday commercials on repeat? How will our kids know what to ask Santa for?

 

Sep/Oct
2018

Women’s Empowerment

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Written by Jorrie Johnson

I’VE BEEN RESEARCHING AND THINKING ABOUT WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT. I FOUND PAPERS PUBLISHED ABOUT EMPOWERING WOMEN GLOBALLY AND NATIONALLY. LOCALLY, I HAVE SEEN MARCHES, MEETINGS AND THE LOCAL #USTOO MULTIMEDIA ARTS EVENT. ROCHESTERWOMEN HOSTED OUR OWN WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT (WE) EVENT FOR WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS AT THE END OF JULY. WE WILL BE CO-SPONSORING WOMEN IN BUSINESS EVENTS (PAGE 26).

In this issue of RochesterWomen magazine, read about Marissa Larson (page 11), a beautiful young woman who overcame depression, chemical dependency and the challenges of being deaf. Through treatment and her own resiliency, she is recovering and now advocates for the deaf. She says, “We can do everything but hear.”  

Next, read about two local female doctors who created the GRIT for Women in Medicine: Growth, Resilience, Inspiration and Tenacity conference to be held September 20-22 in Truckee, California (page 13). The conference will “empower women and men in medicine with the skills and resources to remove barriers and bias of women in leadership positions specific to the challenges in health care.” 

 

Sep/Oct
2018

Marissa Larson: Raising her voice to help others

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Written by Tori Utley Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

MARISSA LARSON HAS HAD HER FAIR SHARE OF CHALLENGES. FROM LEARNING TO ACCLIMATE TO LIFE AS A DEAF PERSON TO EXPERIENCING ALCOHOLISM AND DEPRESSION, HER STORY CAN TEACH US ALL ABOUT THE VALUE OF RESILIENCY—AND HOW BOUNCING BACK FROM DIFFICULTY IS WHERE OUR GREATEST PURPOSE CAN BE FOUND. 

We Can Do Everything But Hear

Larson has been deaf most of her life. The idaho native lost her hearing when she was just 3 years old for reasons doctors could never explain. Having to learn to live, communicate and play differently, Larson says growing up deaf wasn’t always easy. And with a few family moves across the country—from Idaho to Texas and, finally, to Minnesota—it was challenging to find friends and build a community.

“It wasn’t easy growing up b-eing the only deaf person in my school,” Larson says. “I was bullied, left out a lot and struggled to make friends who were willing to learn sign language or take the time to get to know me.”

But Larson knew, as do others living with a disability, that she was much more than a deaf person. She was a daughter and a friend, excelled academically, had a great sense of humor and was a great athlete. Today, as an advocate for the deaf community, she’s made it her mission to educate others who “can do everything but hear.”

 

It began with discussions at book club: the burnout of women in the medical field, disparity in diversity and inclusion, gender parity and the proverbial “glass ceiling.” These issues became a recurring theme with the book club—then they decided to do something about it.

“They” are Anjali Bhagra, M.D. and Susan Moeschler, M.D. The “something” developed into the GRIT for Women in Medicine: Growth, Resilience, Inspiration, and Tenacity conference, the weekend of September 20-22 at the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe in Truckee, California. According to the two organizers, the conference was conceived three years ago and took 18 months to plan.  

SOLD OUT EVENT

 “There has been an overwhelming response,” said Dr. Bhagra. “We had to limit the numbers due to the size of the facility.” Selling out at approximately 300, is a strong message that let organizers know they had hit a nerve in the medical community. The target audience is broad according to organizers: professional women and men in health care who are interested in developing a gender-balanced leadership that is representative of patient population and society.

 

Sep/Oct
2018

Changing the World One Weekend at a Time

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Written by Virginia Cooper

ALL BELIEFS ARE HONORED AT THE WOMEN AND SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE

LAST SEPTEMBER, OVER 750 PARTICIPANTS OF THE 36TH WOMEN AND SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE WERE WARMLY WELCOMED AT THE NEWLY REDESIGNED MAYO CIVIC CENTER. THE CONFERENCE OFFERED 84 DIFFERENT WORKSHOPS ON TOPICS RELATED TO FEMINISM, SPIRITUALITY, HOLISTIC HEALING, SELF-HELP AND MORE. OVER 80 VENDORS OFFERED THEIR UNIQUE WARES IN THE EXHIBIT AREA, PLUS MANY READERS AND HEALERS WERE ON HAND TO OFFER THEIR GUIDANCE. LILAC WELLNESS CENTER CREATED A BEAUTIFUL SPACE FOR MASSAGE AND BODYWORK WITH A QUIET AREA FOR MEDITATION AND REFLECTION.

EVER-CHANGING CONFERENCE

After 35 years at Minnesota State University (formerly Mankato State University), the conference now finds its home in Rochester. Evolving from their Women’s Studies Department in 1981, the conference has given voice to those with a message to share through teaching a workshop and those open to new insights or experiences through learning, personal growth or healing. Their mission statement reflects their goal to provide a “supportive and nurturing setting for a dialogue of caring and mutual respect between and among women and men from many spiritual and religious traditions.”

Over the years, the conference has been a safe space for experiential workshops like yoga, drumming, moving meditation or dance, discussion groups, lectures and presentations. Many of the presenters have utilized the conference to present papers for their master’s thesis or doctoral research on topics ranging from theology to feminism. What has made it a fascinating experience is that it changes completely from year to year with new presenters, new workshops, new talents and new ideas.

 

SINCE THE BEGINNING OF TIME, WOMEN HAVE BRAVELY AND TIRELESSLY FOUGHT TO ASSERT THEIR POSITIONS AS EXPERTS, TRAILBLAZERS AND INNOVATORS. FROM COCO CHANEL TO MARIE CURIE, NORA EPHRON TO ROSA PARKS, MAYA ANGELOU TO ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, THESE INSPIRATIONAL LEADERS SHARE A COMMON BOND: THEY DID NOT LET FEAR, DOUBT OR CONSEQUENCE INHIBIT THEIR ABILITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIP

From elementary school class elections to the race for the White House, people want to understand what ensures success as a leader. But what often goes unrecognized is that there are many different visions of what constitutes a successful leader.

Imagine if each of the women above had followed the exact same – path to “successful leadership.” They may not have achieved all that they did or have as much of an impact on the world. What made them incredible leaders were their unique dreams, talents, goals, influences, opportunities and many other qualities that each possessed and shared with others.

 

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