Sep/Oct
2011

From the Editor - Sep/Oct 2011

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Written by Ellington Miller

0007The best part about working on this magazine is meeting the women willing to share their stories, because not all stories are easy to tell, and not all of them have happy endings. I read some and think, “I don’t know how she endured that” or “I wish I had the guts to do what she did.”

    However, each story represents a woman living among us, and the struggles she faces easily could be our struggles. Seldom do we choose our challenges; we rise to them.

 

Jul/Aug
2011

Remodeler's Corner

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Written by Gina Depuydt

remodelerpsdDo you ever find your kitchen cabinets lacking? Before you grab a sledge hammer mallet and begin demolition like homeowners Ray Samson and Kimberly Jungas-Samson did, decide on a design.

    “I worked in construction for 10 years,” Ray explained. “After we spent time looking over four different concepts, we brought samples of the wood and tiles home to try them in our kitchen.” Visualizing what you hope to accomplish is key.

 

Jul/Aug
2011

Dr. Jack

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Written by Bob Freund

drjack bedSitting in her high chair after lunch time, Savannah Mielke lets out a little squeal when she spots Dr. Jack entering her hospital room. “She’s 20 months old and she adores Jack,” her mother, Autumn Mielke, of Rochester, explains.

   Dr. Jack doesn’t arrive with a clipboard and a list of medical degrees behind his name. Patients instead are taken with his impeccable pedigree—full-blooded miniature pinscher—and his engaging bedside manner. It often includes jumping into the patient’s bed and nuzzling on command.

 

Jul/Aug
2011

Help and Hearts for Japan

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Written by Trish Amundson

japanHow can I help?” is what many people asked after hearing the news of the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11. In the wake of the devastation, Rochester area community members and organizations are giving of their time, energy, financial resources—and their hearts—to help the people in Japan.

Zumbathon!

 

Jul/Aug
2011

Moving in to the Outback

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Written by Angie Johnson-Vanner

austrailiaI saw something unusual the other day. Ten years ago I would have thought I had stumbled into a live-action taping of The Crocodile Hunter, but I’ve acclimated to my home since then.

    I was on a walk, strolling along a suburban street, pushing my children in the pram (stroller). A bare-chested, middle-aged bloke (man), wearing only thongs (flip-flops) and footy (rugby) shorts, was walking across his garden (yard), carrying a pitchfork in one hand and a big ’ol snake (a big ’ol snake) in the other. He walked to the bush (woods) that bordered his property and promptly chucked the snake in, presumably because that was where it had come from. He saw me stopped on the sidewalk staring at him.

 

Jul/Aug
2011

Whining, hitting and tantrums, Oh My

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Written by Raelene Ostberg

tantrumHelping young children manage emotions

It is difficult to fully prepare for the rocky emotional world of a young child. Despite an adult’s most concerted efforts, one-year-olds may still bite, hit or throw things; two-year-olds still experience tantrums and yell “No!” and “Mine!”; three-year-olds still doddle and whine; and four-year-olds still act bossy and demanding. Even the most skilled adults may experience frustration and feelings of failure.

 

Jul/Aug
2011

From Nose to Tail: Females in Veterinary Medicine

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Written by Marlene Petersen

nosetotailDr. Becky Richardson, associate veterinarian at Cascade Animal Medical Center, once heard a saying in school: “A DVM [Doctor of Veterinary Medicine] is an MD that is not limited to one species.”

    Like an MD, a DVM needs a bachelor’s degree and four years of veterinary (versus medical) school. Unlike most MDs, however, Dr. Richardson—and each of the 15 female vets practicing in Rochester—treat their patients from head to hoof, performing everything from dentistry to surgery on every species from bobcat to potbelly pig.  

 

vetIn the 1960s, 100 percent of veterinarians were men. Dr. Sarah Mehrkens, owner of Zumbro Falls Veterinary Clinic, is glad that has changed. Today, 77 percent of today’s veterinary graduates are women.

    “It’s a great profession, and I am thankful I have had the opportunity,” said Mehrkens. “I have wanted to be a vet since I was 13,” she said. 

 

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