May/Jun
2017

Child Care: A Challenging but Rewarding Career Path

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Written by Jorrie Johnson

Choosing someone who will not only watch, but teach my child when he's not in my care is one of the most important decisions, I feel as a parent, I am called to make,” explains Laura Smith. 

Ideally parents find a child care provider that matches their work hours, is located near or on the way to work and meets their quality standards. However, the leading factor for finding child care around Rochester lately has been availability.  

LACK OF AVAILABILITY

There is a shortage of child care providers in the Rochester area. Smith started looking for child care when she was just three months pregnant with her first child. She contacted more than 100 different providers (both in-home child care and child care centers). According to Smith, “All of them for the most part said the same thing: ‘I feel for you.’”  

 

The arrival of a new baby is a life-altering experience encompassing a range of emotions. While weeks of preparation go into planning for the birth experience, there is a considerable gap in resources to address the needs of mothers after birth. In a recent report by the International Labour Organization, the United States—one of the few countries in the world without a federally mandated parental leave policy—received a failing grade in prioritizing support for women entering motherhood. 

Allison Loftus, MA, LPC, and Brittany Baker have a vision to fill that gap by providing services to empower and support women through the transition—whether it is first-time motherhood, a repeat pregnancy or even an adoption. 

MEDCITY DOULAS 

“The postpartum experience I had in the hospital with my first baby was eye-opening,” says Baker. “There were many gaps in the kinds of care women are receiving.”

 

May/Jun
2017

Fare with Flair: Mother and Daughter Restaurant Owners Share Love of Fun Fare

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Written by Sarah Oslund Photography by Fagan Studios

At the tender age of 9, Lindsay Zubay got her first taste of the restaurant business. She worked alongside her mother, father and two brothers at Newt’s, a long-time Rochester burger staple. Lindsay delivered food to customers’ tables. 

“I hated it,” she says, laughing. “The tables were numbered and, as a kid, I couldn’t always figure out where the food was supposed to go.” 

Now, two decades later, Lindsay is co-owner with her brother, Jason, and chef Justin Schoville of Rochester’s trendy new eatery, Porch, where they serve “urban farm fare that feeds your soul, as well as fills your stomach.”

WORKING ALONGSIDE HER MOTHER

LeeAnn Zubay is a staple herself in the Rochester restaurant scene. She is the owner and creative mind behind the successful ZZest Cafe & Bar, located on 16th Street Southwest, as well as the ZZest Lunch Counter and Market, which operate in the First Avenue Food Court in the downtown skyway. 

 

May/Jun
2017

Food Trucks of Rochester: Fast, Fresh, Fun

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Written by Emily Watkins Photography by Dawn Sanborn Photography

Food trucks! Easy, quick and delicious food to eat while basking in the warm sun. Do they make you think of summer?

With a mobile food unit permit from the Rochester City Council, food trucks can set up in the designated zone downtown, on private or public property as approved. All licenses or permits required by the State Health Department or Olmsted County Public Health must be obtained as well. These permits help ensure food safety for consumers.

FOOD TRUCK PURPOSES

Bryan Bachman, owner of Catering For All It’s Worth, says, “There are three main purposes for a food truck. First is selling downtown to the lunch crowd. Second is catering for private parties like birthdays, graduations or weddings. Third is setting up shop at breweries on weekends to provide food for people who want food to go with their local brews.”

 

May/Jun
2017

Women and Wine: Hand-Picked Bottles of Wine for You

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Written by Nicole L. Czarnomski Photos by Dawn Sanborn Photography

If you’re cracking open a bottle of wine on a regular basis, you probably have a small cellar or rack for adequate storage. If so, we have several suggestions from a few local wine clubs who hand-pick the perfect bottles of wine to help keep your cellar stocked and your glasses full. 

TESSA’S OFFICE

Explore Tessa’s Office wine boutique, a quaint little shop located in downtown Rochester. Although the boutique is small in size, there are more than 140 bottles of wine from around the world, all hand-picked by Tessa Leung and her team of wine experts. 

Tessa’s Office offers a three-tiered wine club, each with a clever title. The first tier is known as the Bud Break, which in wine terminology means when the grape starts its annual growth cycle. The first tier is an introduction to fabulous wines that won’t break the bank. Each month, you receive three bottles of wine for $50. Leung and her team selected three Spanish wines for the month of May, and for June there are three bottles of wine from Sonoma. 

 

May/Jun
2017

Local Author Debbie Lampi Releases Second Novel

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Written by Catherine H. Armstrong

Rochester author, Debbie Lampi, is celebrating the release of her second full-length novel. Written under the pen name D.A. Lampi, “An Unfortunate Death” was released in September 2016 by New Concepts Publishing. 

The novel focuses on the character, Johanna Hedrick, a psychologist who unwillingly becomes embroiled in a murder investigation when her college-age daughter begins an obsessive romantic relationship with her creative writing professor, who also happens to be Johanna’s client. When the professor’s lover is found dead, suspicions turn to him, until a cell phone belonging to Johanna’s daughter is found at the murder scene.

LAMPI EXPLAINS THE CHARACTERS

“The story is told in alternating chapters through the eyes of Johanna, Leah (the daughter) and Thomas Yeager (the professor),” Lampi explains. “Each of the characters in the novel holds deep secrets that come together in a maelstrom of sex, desire and, ultimately, the death of a young woman. I’m drawn to each of them because of their troubled pasts, their human frailties and the lengths they will go to protect those they love.”

 

May/Jun
2017

Spring Cleansing with Ballerina Botanicals

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Written by Michaelene Karlen

Every day, this time of year, all of our social media feeds fill up with tips for spring cleaning, time to detox and better yet…get your body ready for summer. This can all be very overwhelming. I know, I always feel the pressure. 

One thing I can always count on to help me relax and feel refreshed is a good facial with organic essential oils. Essential oils are fragrant, concentrated essences from botanical life that provide the body with many healing properties. They work wonders on your skin. My friends are always complimenting my clear skin, so I tell them all about my spring cleansing routine. 

YOUR FRIENDS WiLL NOTICE

The reason you should be doing this is because the winter months and seasonal changes do a number to your skin, leaving it dry, dull and damaged. Harsh central heating, dry air, sudden temperature changes and hot showers all wreak havoc on your skin. 

 

May/Jun
2017

RNeighbors: Reaching Out to Bring Neighbors Together

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Written by Alison Rentschler Photos Provided by Rene Lafflam, RNeighbors

RNeighbors, a Rochester nonprofit created in 2001, has impacted many neighborhoods in Rochester in the past 16 years. Rene Lafflam, executive director of RNeighbors since 2006, says, “We’re about engagement and getting neighbors to interact with neighbors and with the city departments.” 

Lafflam continues, “My end goal is to bring neighbors together.” In many neighborhoods throughout Rochester, RNeighbors has accomplished that.

PROJECTS THROUGHOUT THE CITY

RNeighbors has been involved in several programs throughout the city, including tree planting (RNeighborWoods) and creative crosswalks. You might have stepped across painted crosswalks or seen the trees planted in town. 

 

May/Jun
2017

Mayowood Greenhouse: A Glimpse into its Unique Past

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Written by Amy Hahn Photos by Dawn Sanborn Photography

New construction dominates the narrow stretch of Mayowood Road, but remnants of Mayowood’s idyllic 3,000-acre estate remain, reflected in the rambling span of stone fence, the English style “dragon’s tooth” and other stone structures. Just past the Mayowood Stone Barn, now an event venue, and before the entrance to Mayowood Mansion, is Mayowood Greenhouse Galleries, a property with ties to Dr. Charlie Mayo and Edith Graham Mayo’s grand country estate.

AN ELEGANT BUSINESS

Owned by Rita Hawke Mayo, Mayowood Greenhouse Galleries has a long history of selling European antiques. The shop’s origins trace back to the 60s, when Rita and her husband, Edward “Ned” Martin Mayo, son of Dr. Chuck Mayo and Alice Plank Mayo, renovated Mayowood’s historic greenhouse. 

“The greenhouse wings were remodeled to support the antique business my parents created,” says Lilli Mayo Weivoda. “The building footprint is the same. It’s just enclosed.” 

 

May/Jun
2017

Remodeler's Corner: Modernizing the Wright Home Beginning in the Kitchen

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Written by Bob Freund Photos Provided by The Kitchen Design Studio

The refrigerator at Patty and Jim Wright’s home deserves some credit for the couple’s full kitchen remodel. For years, opening the refrigerator door had blocked the doorway to the kitchen’s walk-in pantry. Then, the fridge itself started going on the fritz. In short, “It (remodeling) started with getting a new refrigerator and snowballed from there,” Patty says. 

REFRIGERATOR TO REMODELING

Today, the couple and their two teenagers enjoy a completely renovated kitchen in their 20-year-old home. About half of the main floor in the northwest Rochester home has been renovated to maximize use of space and enrich the decor. 

In fall of 2015, Patty, a microbiologist, and Jim, a software programmer, decided to explore remodeling. They found The Kitchen Design Studio of Rochester on the internet (houzz.com), and KDS designer Don Gustason found underused space in a short hallway bordering the kitchen. By tearing down a wall, the Wrights and KDS were able to close off the pantry, move in a new refrigerator and add counter space to the kitchen. There also was enough room left on the far side of the hallway to replace the pantry with a bank of cupboard cabinets for food storage.

 

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