Strength


By rwwpadmin

Issue: Jul/Aug 2019

At the end of January this year, my daughter Tiffany and I signed up for the Trinona triathlon. Throughout the winter we went to the Y for Strength Train Together and yoga classes. In the spring, she got a shiny, new silver Raleigh road bike from Bicycle Sports. We worked on our swimming, biking and running. We talked about our training and our goals. Finally, the big day came. We woke up early on Sunday morning, June 9, and anxiously drove over to Winona. Two by two, we entered the perfectly warm water in age waves for the one-quarter mile swim. Then, the 11-mile scenic bike route took us through rolling bluff country. Finally, we ran the 3.1-mile run half way around beautiful Lake Winona and we were done in under an hour and a half. Yes, we were tired afterward, but we are strong. Now, we are looking for our next triathlon, journey and destination.  

What is strength to you? Is it emotional strength? Does it mean you keep going when you are emotionally drained? Is it mental strength? Is it completing an education or professional goal? Is it physical strength? Strength is visible in many forms. Lindsey Vonn, a native Minnesotan and Olympic Alpine gold medalist, has a book out titled “Strong Is the New Beautiful: Embrace Your Natural Beauty, Eat Clean, and Harness Your Power” (2016). In the book, she gives lessons in strength, fitness, food and attitude.

In this July/August 2019 issue of Rochester Women magazine, meet beautiful and strong Jennifer Lawver, one woman who is redefining the face of the construction industry (page 17). She not only operates heavy equipment, she also develops property and serves on the Rochester Area Builders board of directors. Lawver takes care of her body through nutrition, exercise and body building.  

We continue our series on self-worth with an article about “The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook” and workshop (page 11). Practicing unconditional acceptance toward ourselves takes strength, particularly when we are in difficult situations.

To have a stronger, healthier relationship with food and the community, read “Every Meal Has a Story to Tell” (page 24). Meet a few restauranteurs and find out how they use locally grown and produced food. 

It is my pleasure to announce that I have taken a project manager position with the City of Rochester to oversee women and minority owned business goals and workforce participation for Destination Medical Center projects. I am honored to have the opportunity to serve as a public employee. This means I will be changing my role at Rochester Women magazine. 

You are beautiful, confident and worthy!